Dorothy Macardle (1889-1958)

9 Macardle“It would be strange, indeed, if the vigour and content of the living could not banish the lingering sorrows of the dead.” – The Uninvited (1941)

Dorothy Macardle—historian, playwright, journalist, and novelist—was born in Dundalk, Co. Louth. She was educated at Alexandra College in Dublin where she later lectured in English literature. She is best remembered for her seminal treatise on Ireland’s struggle for independence, The Irish Republic (1937), but also wrote novels of the uncanny, including The Uninvited (1941), The Unforeseen (1946), and Dark Enchantment (1953). She died in Drogheda and is buried in St. Fintan’s Cemetery, Sutton.

Earth-Bound Novels and Collections

Earth-Bound and Other Supernatural Tales (1924)

The Uninvited (1941)

The Unforeseen (1946)

The Dark Enchantment (1953)

Short Stories

“Samhain” (1924)

“The Prisoner” (1924)

“The Portrait of Roisin Dhu” (1924)

“The Venetian Mirror” (1924)

Find out more about Irish Writers of the Fantastic.


Green Book 09In 2016 Swan River Press reprinted Dorothy Macardle’s debut collection Earth-Bound—ghost stories written in both Kilmainham Gaol and Mountjoy Prison—in a lavish, limited edition hardback. This is the first time the book has been reprinted since 1924. With a new introduction by Peter Berresford Ellis, and the addition of stories uncovered in the archives, Earth-Bound and Other Supernatural Tales is the perfect way to rediscover the work of an extraordinary writer.

We’ve also featured Macardle quite extensively in various issues of The Green Book. Issue 7 not only includes a lengthy article on the life and works of Macardle, “A Reflection of Ghosts” by Peter Berresford Ellis, but the same issue reprints two of her poems, “Easter” and “The City”.  In Issue 8 we reprinted a hitherto unpublished short story by Macardle called “The Boys’ Room”, which includes a fascinating introduction by scholar Terri Neil.

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Dorothy Macardle (1889-1958)

James Stephens (1880-1950)

8 Stephens“What the heart knows today the head will understand tomorrow.”

– The Crock of Gold (1912)

James Stephens was born in Dublin in 1880. Like many young Irish poets of the early twentieth century, Stephens started his career under the tutelage of A.E.; he dedicated his debut poetry collection, Insurrections (1909), to his mentor. In Irish Fairy Tales (1920, illustrated by Arthur Rackham) and Deirdre (1923), Stephens explored the myths and legends of Ireland. His best remembered books are his Dublin novel The Charwoman’s Daughter (1912) and the philosophical fantasy The Crock of Gold (1912). He died in England in 1950.

136e52e37fb2b8e75873c34b7de2c8d8--wolves-art-illustration-artistsNovels and Collections

The Crock of Gold (1912)

The Demi-Gods (1914)

Irish Fairy Tales (1920)

In the Land of Youth (1924)

Collected Poems (1926)

Find out more about Irish Writers of the Fantastic.


Like Lord Dunsany, James Stephens was involved in the 1916 Easter Rising. His visceral account was later published in a riveting volume called The Insurrection in Dublin (1916), an extract of which was reproduced in Issue 7 of The Green Book. Stephens was also a reader of fantasy literature, and his review of E.R. Eddison’s The Worm Ouroborous (1922) can be found in Issue 8.

James Stephens was also celebrated for his superb poetical recitations, which he did often for BBC Radio. Numerous recordings still survive.

James Stephens (1880-1950)

Lord Dunsany (1878-1957)

7 Dunsany“A man is a very small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.”

– The Laughter of the Gods (1917)

Lord Dunsany (Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett; 1878-1957) published his first collection, The Gods of Pegāna, in 1905. He followed this with more than sixty volumes of critically acclaimed stories, novels, plays, poems, and translations. A big-game hunter and a sportsman, Lord Dunsany was also a soldier and a highly ranked chess-player; and was the Byron Professor of English Literature in Athens in 1940-41. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950.

fc9dc8e8b83c8ce8df3a96b15f7835daNovels and Collections

The Gods of Pegāna (1905)

The Sword of Welleran and Other Stories (1908)

Plays of Gods and Men (1917)

The King of Elfland’s Daughter (1924)

The Curse of the Wise Woman (1933)

Short Stories

“The Highwayman” (1908)

“Idle Days on the Yann” (1910)

“A Night at an Inn” (1916)

“The Three Sailors’ Gambit” (1916)

“The Two Bottles of Relish” (1952)

Find out more about Irish Writers of the Fantastic.


Green Book 10If you’re interested in Lord Dunsany, then you’re in luck! We’ve devoted the entirety of Issue 10 of The Green Book to Dunsany. If you’d like to read the Editorial Note and peruse the contents, please head over to our website.

Issue 7 of The Green Book also featured Dunsany, in particular his role in the 1916 Easter Rising via an extract from his autobiography Patches of Sunlight.

And finally, in Issue 2, we’ve an article from Nicola Gordon Bowe, “Lord Dunsany: Portrait of a Collector”, discussing his contributions to the Irish Arts and Crafts movement.

Lord Dunsany (1878-1957)

Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904)

6 Hearn“The Fairy of Science sometimes touches my ears and eyes with her wand; and then, for a little time, I am able to hear things inaudible, and to perceive things imperceptible. – Kwaidan (1904)

Born on the Greek island of Lefkada, Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904) was brought up in both Ireland and England. At nineteen he emigrated to the United States where he became a journalist, first in Cincinnati and later New Orleans. After a sojourn in the French West Indies, he sailed for Japan in 1890. Hearn wrote extensively about his new homeland, its tales, customs, and religions, acting as a bridge between Japan and the Western world. He died in Tokyo where he is buried under his Japanese name, Koizumi Yakumo.

WRCLIT66914 Collections

In Ghostly Japan (1899)

Shadowings (1900)

A Japanese Miscellany (1901)

Kottō: Being Japanese Curios, with Sundry Cobwebs (1902)

Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things (1904)

Short Stories

“Of Ghosts and Goblins” (1894)

“Nightmare-Touch” (1900)

“The Corpse Rider” (1900)

“Mujina” (1904)

“The Story of Mimi-Nashi-Hōïchi” (1904)

“The Dream of Akinosuké” (1904)

Find out more about Irish Writers of the Fantastic.


Insect LiteratureUnfortunately our sole Lafcadio Hearn title, Insect Literature, is now out of print. However, you can still read our blog post on what went in to the making of this much-sought-after volume.

Lafcadio Hearn did, however, feature in a couple issues of The Green Book. In Issue 6 is John Moran’s “Early Influences on Lafcadio Hearn”, while David B. Lurie contributed to Issue 8 “Orientomology   The Insect Literature of Lafcadio Hearn”.

And finally, we’ve one other blog post on Lafcadio Hearn, the reproduction of a letter written by Hearn’s literary executor, Mitchell McDonald.

Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904)

Bram Stoker (1847-1912)

5 Stoker“How blessed are some people, whose lives have no fears, no dreads; to whom sleep is a blessing that comes nightly, and brings nothing but sweet dreams.”   – Dracula (1897)

Bram Stoker (1847-1912) was born in Clontarf, Dublin, and educated at Trinity College. As a young man he worked as a civil servant at Dublin Castle, and as an unpaid theatre critic for local newspapers. He is best known today for his classic horror novel Dracula (1897), but during his lifetime he was known as the personal assistant of actor Henry Irving, and business manager of Irving’s Lyceum Theatre in London. Other notable works include The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903), Personal Reminiscences of Henry Irving (1906), The Lair of the White Worm (1911), and the posthumously published collections Dracula’s Guest and Other Weird Stories (1914) and Old Hoggen and Other Adventures (2017).

13e09088602f1915cef60bed8012b2e9Novels and Collections

The Snake’s Pass (1890)

Dracula (1897)

The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903)

The Lady of the Shroud (1909)

Lair of the White Worm (1911)

Dracula’s Guest and Other Weird Stories (1914)

Old Hoggen and Other Adventures (2017)

Short Stories

“The Judge’s House” (1891)

“Old Hoggen: A Mystery” (1893)

“Burial of the Rats” (1896)

“Dracula’s Guest” (1914)

Find out more about Irish Writers of the Fantastic.


Old HoggenSwan River Press has a number of Bram Stoker publications available, including the limited edition Old Hoggen and Other Adventures, which collects numerous rare and hitherto uncollected stories by the master of the macabre.

We also have three issues of The Green Book that feature Stoker material, including John Edgar Browning’s interview with Stoker’s most recent biographer, David J. Skal, Elizabeth Miller’s fascinating “Shape-shifting Dracula: The Abridged Edition of 1901″, and Carol A. Senf’s essay on The Snake’s Pass and Lady Athlyne.

Finally, there’s our Bram Stoker Series of hand-sewn booklets. The Stoker Series was originally published from 2009 to 2011. We launched the series as a means to investigate some of the more obscure but no less interesting corners of Bram Stoker’s life and literature. The sort of fragments that might otherwise not find their way into publication.

Bram Stoker (1847-1912)

Charlotte Riddell (1832-1906)

4 Riddell“I could positively declare my heart did cease beating as I listened, looking out into the night with the shadow of that darkness projecting itself upon my mind” – The Uninhabited House (1875)

Charlotte Riddell (1832-1906)—who often published as “Mrs. J.H. Riddell”—was born in Carrickfergus, Co. Antrim. In 1855 she moved to London and began producing numerous popular novels, most of which are now out of print. However, it is for her Christmas ghost stories that she is still widely read. Many of her best ghostly fictions were collected in the landmark volume Weird Stories (1882), while her uncollected tales remain a staple of supernatural anthologies to this day. Though she experienced financial hardships later in life, Riddell was still well-regarded and received a pension from the Royal Literary Fund from 1900 until her passing six years later.

Riddelluninhabited2Novels and Collections

The Uninhabited House (1875)

The Haunted River (1877)

Weird Stories (1882)

Short Stories

“The Banshee’s Warning” (1867)

“A Strange Christmas Game” (1868)

“The Old House in Vauxhall Walk” (1882)

“Walnut-Tree House” (1882)

Find out more about Irish Writers of the Fantastic.


Green Book 09If you’re interested in learning more about Charlotte Riddell, you might like to check out Issue 9 of our journal, The Green Book. In “Hauntings and Haunted: Charlotte Riddell’s Weird Stories”, Mike Barrett gives a wonderful overview of Riddell’s supernatural writings. Supplementing Barrett’s essay is an indispensable checklist of Riddell’s ghostly fiction.

In the same issue, you’ll also find articles about Elizabeth Bowen, Shirley Jackson, Rosa Mulholland, Dorothy Macardle, and Caitlin R. Kiernan.

Charlotte Riddell (1832-1906)

Fitz-James O’Brien (1828-1862)

3 O'Brien“It was shaped like a man—distorted, uncouth, and horrible, but still a man.” – “What Was It?” (1859)

Fitz-James O’Brien was born in Cork on 25 October 1828. Little is known of his early life, though he attended Trinity College and, after a short period in London, emigrated to America around 1851. In New York he joined the artistic Bohemian set, and began writing for various magazines, including Harper’s, Vanity Fair, and Atlantic Monthly. At the outset of the American Civil War in 1861, O’Brien joined the New York National Guard. He was wounded in February 1862, and later died of tetanus on 6 April. His most notable stories and poems were collected in 1881 by his friend and literary executor William Winter. O’Brien’s proto-science fiction stories, such as “The Diamond Lens” and “What Was It?”, are now considered landmarks of the genre.

TheDiamondLens565 Collections

The Poems and Stories of Fitz-James O’Brien (1881)

Short Stories

“The Diamond Lens” (1858)

“The Wondersmith” (1859)

“What Was It?” (1859)

“The Demon of the Gibbet” (1881)

Find out more about Irish Writers of the Fantastic.


grande_gb5If you’re interested in reading more about Fitz-James O’Brien, have a look at Issue 5 of our journal The Green Book, which features the essay “Fitz-James O’Brien: The Seen and the Unseen” by Kevin Corstorphine.

Fitz-James O’Brien (1828-1862)