James Stephens (1880-1950)

8 Stephens“What the heart knows today the head will understand tomorrow.”

– The Crock of Gold (1912)

James Stephens was born in Dublin in 1880. Like many young Irish poets of the early twentieth century, Stephens started his career under the tutelage of A.E.; he dedicated his debut poetry collection, Insurrections (1909), to his mentor. In Irish Fairy Tales (1920, illustrated by Arthur Rackham) and Deirdre (1923), Stephens explored the myths and legends of Ireland. His best remembered books are his Dublin novel The Charwoman’s Daughter (1912) and the philosophical fantasy The Crock of Gold (1912). He died in England in 1950.

136e52e37fb2b8e75873c34b7de2c8d8--wolves-art-illustration-artistsNovels and Collections

The Crock of Gold (1912)

The Demi-Gods (1914)

Irish Fairy Tales (1920)

In the Land of Youth (1924)

Collected Poems (1926)

Find out more about Irish Writers of the Fantastic.


Like Lord Dunsany, James Stephens was involved in the 1916 Easter Rising. His visceral account was later published in a riveting volume called The Insurrection in Dublin (1916), an extract of which was reproduced in Issue 7 of The Green Book. Stephens was also a reader of fantasy literature, and his review of E.R. Eddison’s The Worm Ouroborous (1922) can be found in Issue 8.

James Stephens was also celebrated for his superb poetical recitations, which he did often for BBC Radio. Numerous recordings still survive.

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James Stephens (1880-1950)

2 thoughts on “James Stephens (1880-1950)

  1. scherbenwind says:

    Hi brian query. Will peter bells book “strange epifanies” be reprinted anyway soon.im kicking myself i didnt buy it first time rond? Paul

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Like

    1. A little bit off topic with regard to James Stephens!

      But no, I don’t have any immediate plans to reprint the book. Swan River Press specialises in limited editions, so for the most part, once they’re gone, they’re gone. Only in very rare cases will I reprint, though always with a stated second edition.

      The good news is, I’ll be working again with Peter in the near future.

      Like

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