Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904)

6 Hearn“The Fairy of Science sometimes touches my ears and eyes with her wand; and then, for a little time, I am able to hear things inaudible, and to perceive things imperceptible. – Kwaidan (1904)

Born on the Greek island of Lefkada, Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904) was brought up in both Ireland and England. At nineteen he emigrated to the United States where he became a journalist, first in Cincinnati and later New Orleans. After a sojourn in the French West Indies, he sailed for Japan in 1890. Hearn wrote extensively about his new homeland, its tales, customs, and religions, acting as a bridge between Japan and the Western world. He died in Tokyo where he is buried under his Japanese name, Koizumi Yakumo.

WRCLIT66914 Collections

In Ghostly Japan (1899)

Shadowings (1900)

A Japanese Miscellany (1901)

Kottō: Being Japanese Curios, with Sundry Cobwebs (1902)

Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things (1904)

Short Stories

“Of Ghosts and Goblins” (1894)

“Nightmare-Touch” (1900)

“The Corpse Rider” (1900)

“Mujina” (1904)

“The Story of Mimi-Nashi-Hōïchi” (1904)

“The Dream of Akinosuké” (1904)

Find out more about Irish Writers of the Fantastic.


Insect LiteratureUnfortunately our sole Lafcadio Hearn title, Insect Literature, is now out of print. However, you can still read our blog post on what went in to the making of this much-sought-after volume.

Lafcadio Hearn did, however, feature in a couple issues of The Green Book. In Issue 6 is John Moran’s “Early Influences on Lafcadio Hearn”, while David B. Lurie contributed to Issue 8 “Orientomology   The Insect Literature of Lafcadio Hearn”.

And finally, we’ve one other blog post on Lafcadio Hearn, the reproduction of a letter written by Hearn’s literary executor, Mitchell McDonald.

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Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904)

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